Science

How the H-Trap Catches Horse Flies

Nature goes hand in hand with the design and effectiveness of our professional horse fly control system and trap.

Three elements attract female horse flies to find the blood source that enables them to reproduce– contrast, heat sensory, and scent.

By placing our horse fly traps in strategically sunny locations, ideally where horses and people congregate, the inflatable black ball will begin to trick the horse flies into coming onto it.

When the inflatable black ball absorbs heat, it gives off an infrared signature, which attracts the biting female horse to fly to the ball rather than to the animals and humans nearby.

Once on the black ball, the females will try to bite their “victims” without success. Because horse flies fly vertically, the green plastic conical hood guides them upwards into the green plastic collection bin atop the horse fly trap.

There is no escape from there, and the horsefly will die from dehydration or drowning if you add water to the collection bin.

Identifying Horse Flies

Remember that not all biting flies are horse flies, even though they may bother your horses!

The flies our horse fly trap catches are commonly known as greenheads, yellow flies, deer flies, and black B-52 bombers. These flies are from the family Tabanidae.


Other biting flies that bother horses and help carry diseases are stable flies and horn flies. These are from the Muscidae family. Horse fly eggs and larvae are found in wet, swampy areas. Stable flies and horn fly eggs and larvae are found in fecal matter, urine-soaked bedding, or in the wet, decomposing straw found around round hay bales.

Another difference is the way these different flies bite. Signs of horse fly bites are trails of blood from the wound that the horse fly leaves after cutting the skin and pumping in a substance that allows the blood to flow. Stable fly and horn fly bites tend to be less bloody, with much smaller ‘dots’ of blood left after feeding.

If you are still unsure about the type of flies on your property, please contact us before purchasing an H-Trap. If you have pictures that can help our entomologist identify the flies that are bothering your animals and family, please send them to us by email at [email protected].

Studies

New Study in France Uses 7 H-Traps to Collect Tabanids

New Study in France Uses 7 H-Traps to Collect Tabanids

The H-Trap Professional Horse Fly Trap System continues to be the first choice amongst  researchers studying tabanids (aka horse flies)...
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2 Research Studies Find the H-Trap the Best Monitoring Trap

2 Research Studies Find the H-Trap the Best Monitoring Trap

The news is out!  The Bite-Lite H-Trap Professional Horse Fly Trap has been vetted by researchers as the "best monitoring...
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New Bite-Lite Fly Lure Proven Effective in MA and TX Testing

New Bite-Lite Fly Lure Proven Effective in MA and TX Testing

Bite-Lite’s Biting Insect Lure came on the market in 2018 following testing in Massachusetts and Texas.    Our research has shown...
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Comparison of Adult Horse Fly Collections in Massachusetts (2016)

Comparison of Adult Horse Fly Collections in Massachusetts (2016)

Bite-Lite continued testing the efficacy of the H-Trap Professional Horse Fly Control System in Cape Cod this July, 2016.   This...
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Comparison of Adult Horse Fly Collections  in Massachusetts (2015)

Comparison of Adult Horse Fly Collections in Massachusetts (2015)

In the summer of 2015, the Cape Cod Greenhead Fly Control Project, a division of the Mosquito Control District, compared...
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Comparison of Adult Tabanidae (Horse Fly) Collections at a Wildlife Refuge Near a Horse Boarding Facility in Cedar Key, Florida

Comparison of Adult Tabanidae (Horse Fly) Collections at a Wildlife Refuge Near a Horse Boarding Facility in Cedar Key, Florida

The United States Department of Agriculture conducted testing in the summer of 2014, comparing horse fly collections from two commercial...
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